Serenety Hanley

Setting the tone for the day.

(Source: Spotify)

My entire music collection is made for #throwbackthursday

(Source: Spotify)

album perfection

(Source: Spotify)

“The sciences are the “how,” and the humanities are the “why” — why are we here, why do we believe in the things we believe in. I don’t think you can have the “how” without the “why.””
George Lucas in defense of the humanities (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

ourpresidents:

Countdown to the space program — Apollo 17 Lunar Rover
Join us on Thursday at noon (or watch on Ustream at www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) to learn more about the American space program as it developed under Presidents Nixon and Ford, including the Apollo missions to the Moon, the decision to develop the space shuttle, and the 1975 Apollo–Soyuz test project.
The event is free at the National Archives in Washington, D.CThursday, June 13, at noonWilliam G. McGowan Theater
Photo Courtesy of NASA: Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 mission commander, makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the early part of the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity. The mountain in the right background is the East end of South Massif.

ourpresidents:

Countdown to the space program — Apollo 17 Lunar Rover

Join us on Thursday at noon (or watch on Ustream at www.ustream.tv/usnationalarchives) to learn more about the American space program as it developed under Presidents Nixon and Ford, including the Apollo missions to the Moon, the decision to develop the space shuttle, and the 1975 Apollo–Soyuz test project.

The event is free at the National Archives in Washington, D.C
Thursday, June 13, at noon
William G. McGowan Theater

Photo Courtesy of NASA: Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 mission commander, makes a short checkout of the Lunar Roving Vehicle during the early part of the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity. The mountain in the right background is the East end of South Massif.

There is very little to be done about all this when space is limited, crowds are large, and humans always — always — put things off until the last minute. But Grand Central, for years now, has relied on a system meant to mitigate, if not prevent, all the crazy. It is this: The times displayed on Grand Central’s departure boards are wrong — by a full minute. This is permanent. It is also purposeful.

The idea is that passengers rushing to catch trains they’re about to miss can actually be dangerous — to themselves, and to each other. So conductors will pull out of the station exactly one minute after their trains’ posted departure times. That minute of extra time won’t be enough to disconcert passengers too much when they compare it to their own watches or smartphones … but it is enough, the thinking goes, to buy late-running train-catchers just that liiiiiitle bit of extra time that will make them calm down a bit. Fast clocks make for slower passengers.

Fascinating read on why the clocks at Grand Central are permanently, deliberately wrong. (via explore-blog)

I do this in my home!

(Source: , via explore-blog)